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Posts for: May, 2019

By Jackson County Dental
May 29, 2019
Category: Oral Health
NoahGallowaysDentallyDangerousDancing

For anyone else, having a tooth accidentally knocked out while practicing a dance routine would be a very big deal. But not for Dancing With The Stars contestant Noah Galloway. Galloway, an Iraq War veteran and a double amputee, took a kick to the face from his partner during a recent practice session, which knocked out a front tooth. As his horrified partner looked on, Galloway picked the missing tooth up from the floor, rinsed out his mouth, and quickly assessed his injury. “No big deal,” he told a cameraman capturing the scene.

Of course, not everyone would have the training — or the presence of mind — to do what Galloway did in that situation. But if you’re facing a serious dental trauma, such as a knocked out tooth, minutes count. Would you know what to do under those circumstances? Here’s a basic guide.

If a permanent tooth is completely knocked out of its socket, you need to act quickly. Once the injured person is stable, recover the tooth and gently clean it with water — but avoid grasping it by its roots! Next, if possible, place the tooth back in its socket in the jaw, making sure it is facing the correct way. Hold it in place with a damp cloth or gauze, and rush to the dental office, or to the emergency room if it’s after hours or if there appear to be other injuries.

If it isn’t possible to put the tooth back, you can place it between the cheek and gum, or in a plastic bag with the patient’s saliva, or in the special tooth-preserving liquid found in some first-aid kits. Either way, the sooner medical attention is received, the better the chances that the tooth can be saved.

When a tooth is loosened or displaced but not knocked out, you should receive dental attention within six hours of the accident. In the meantime, you can rinse the mouth with water and take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication (such as ibuprofen) to ease pain. A cold pack temporarily applied to the outside of the face can also help relieve discomfort.

When teeth are broken or chipped, you have up to 12 hours to get dental treatment. Follow the guidelines above for pain relief, but don’t forget to come in to the office even if the pain isn’t severe. Of course, if you experience bleeding that can’t be controlled after five minutes, dizziness, loss of consciousness or intense pain, seek emergency medical help right away.

And as for Noah Galloway:  In an interview a few days later, he showed off his new smile, with the temporary bridge his dentist provided… and he even continued to dance with the same partner!

If you would like more information about dental trauma, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Trauma & Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries.”


By JACKSON COUNTY DENTAL
May 22, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures

Periodontal disease affects millions of Americans, carrying with it the potential for both tooth and bone loss if left untreated. Are you gumdiseaseconcerned about the health of your gums? At Jackson County Dental in Seymour, IN, your dentists, Dr. Matthew Pierce and Dr. Lane Severe, can help optimize your oral and systemic health through precise preventive and restorative care. Learn more about how they can boost your gum health by reading below!

 

What is periodontal disease?

Periodontal disease has many names: gum disease, gingivitis (mild periodontal disease), and periodontitis (a more advanced type). Inflammatory in nature, periodontal disease feeds on the action of oral bacteria, a kind of microbe that by themselves are normal, but when proliferating in plaque and tartar, can overwhelm the immune system and destroy gum and bone.

Periodontitis is the leading cause of tooth loss among Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Appearing in patients of all ages, this condition can be fended off by:

  • Twice daily brushing
  • Once a day flossing
  • A tooth-friendly diet (low in carbs)
  • Attending semi-annual examinations and cleanings at Jackson County Dental

Besides damaging oral health, gum disease is also connected to systemic health problems such as arthritis, dementia, kidney disease, liver disease, coronary artery disease, low birth weight infants, and diabetes. As you can see, a healthy mouth carries benefits for your entire body!

 

Symptoms of gum disease

Like so many health problems, gum disease begins slowly and insidiously. Some symptoms are barely detectable in the early stages. However, as the problem progresses (from gingivitis to advanced periodontitis), both patient and dentist notice:

  • Bleeding gum tissue
  • Puffiness
  • Tenderness
  • Reddened gums
  • Gum tissue pulling away from tooth surfaces
  • Persistent bad breath
  • Pus
  • Loose and/or drifting teeth
  • Changes in bite
  • Exposed tooth roots

In addition, your hygienist or dentist measures gum pockets—the spaces between the soft tissue and the tooth roots. If you have pockets deeper than three millimeters, treatment is necessary, particularly if these measurements appear with several teeth.

 

Treating periodontal disease

The most common in-office treatment is scaling and root planing. The hygienist uses manual and ultrasonic tools to remove hard tartar from beneath the gum line. As directed by Dr. Pierce or Dr. Severe, antibiotic medication may also be used. Over time, the gums heal and re-attach to tooth surfaces.

More serious cases of gum disease respond best to surgical procedures called gum grafting. There are different ways to add gum tissue to areas of recession, but all aim to cover expose roots and strengthen bone and tooth stability.

Of course, following any one of these treatments, periodontal patients need to attend follow-up appointments at our Seymour office.

 

Contact us

The professional team at Jackson County Dental encourages you to come in for a cleaning and examination every six months. After all, prevention is the key to healthy gums! To schedule your appointment, please call our Seymour office at (812) 522-8608.


ConsideranEffectiveandAffordableRPDforTeethReplacement

If you have a few missing teeth but can't afford dental implants or fixed bridgework, consider a removal partial denture (RPD). Although implants may be the superior choice aesthetically and functionally, an RPD can still effectively give you back your teeth.

RPDs are designed to replace one or more missing teeth but not a full arch like a full denture. Considered a permanent restoration, RPDs are also more durable than transitional "flippers," denture appliances that are flexible and light enough to be flipped out of the mouth with a flick of the tongue.

The key to both their affordability and durability is vitallium, a strong but lightweight metal alloy most often used in their frame construction. To it we attach artificial teeth usually made of porcelain or glass-filled resins that occupy the precise location of the missing teeth on the gum ridge. The artificial teeth and frame are surrounded by gum-colored plastic for a more natural look.

Each RPD is custom-made depending on the number and location of the missing teeth. Its construction will focus on minimizing any rocking movement of the RPD during chewing or biting. Too much of this movement could damage the adjacent teeth it's attaching to and cause the appliance to be uncomfortable to wear. We can stabilize the frame by precisely fitting it between teeth to buttress it. We also insert small rests or clasps made of vitallium at strategic points to grip teeth and minimize movement.

RPDs do have some downsides: their unique attachment with teeth encourages the accumulation of dental plaque, the thin bacterial film that's the leading cause of tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. These diseases can affect your remaining teeth's health and stability, which could in turn disrupt the fit of the RPD. Also, too much movement of the appliance can make the teeth to which it's attached become more mobile. It's important, then, if you wear a RPD to remove it daily for cleaning (and to thoroughly brush and floss your natural teeth), and to remove it at night to give the attaching teeth a rest.

A RPD can give you back the teeth you've lost for many years to come—if you take care of it. Maintaining both your RPD and the rest of your teeth and gums will help extend the life and use of this effective and affordable replacement restoration.

If you would like more information on teeth replacement options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Removable Partial Dentures: Still a Viable Tooth-Replacement Alternative.”


By Jackson County Dental
May 09, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: porcelain veneers  
TransformingYourSmilewithVeneersStepbyStep

Dental veneers are a great way to transform a smile without the expense or effort often required of other restorations. These thin layers of dental material adhere to the front of teeth as a "mask" to cover chips, heavy staining or other blemishes.

Still, veneers require attention to detail for a successful outcome. Here's a step-by-step look at changing your dental appearance with veneers.

Step 1: Considering your options. While most veneers are made of dental porcelain, composite resin materials are increasingly popular. Although more prone to chipping or staining, composite veneers don't require a dental lab for fabrication. Another option, depending on your dental situation, are ultra-thin veneers that require little to no tooth preparation. Your dentist will help you decide which options are best for you.

Step 2: "Test driving" your new smile. We can help you "see" your future smile with special software that creates a computer image of your teeth with the planned veneers. We can also use composite material to fabricate a "trial smile" to temporarily place on your teeth that can give you the feel as well as the look of your future smile.

Step 3: Preparing your teeth. Unless you're getting no-prep veneers, we'll need to modify your teeth before attaching veneers. Although only 0.3 to 0.7 millimeters thick, veneers can still appear bulky on unprepared teeth. They'll look more natural if we first remove a small amount of enamel. A word of caution, though: although slight, this enamel removal permanently alters your teeth that will require them to have some form of restoration from then on.

Step 4: Attaching your new veneers. After the planning phase (which includes color matching to blend the veneers with the rest of your teeth), a dental lab creates your veneers if you've opted for porcelain. After they're delivered, we'll clean and etch the teeth with a mild acidic gel to increase the bonding effect. We'll then permanently attach the veneers to your teeth with a very thin but ultra-strong resin luting cement that creates a unified bond between the veneers and teeth.

Following these steps is the surest way to achieve a successful outcome. With due care you're sure to enjoy the effects for a long time to come.

If you would like more information on changing your smile with veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers: Your Smile—Better than Ever.”